icm2re logo. icm2:re (I Changed My Mind Reviewing Everything) is an  ongoing web column  by Brunella Longo

This column deals with some aspects of change management processes experienced almost in any industry impacted by the digital revolution: how to select, create, gather, manage, interpret, share data and information either because of internal and usually incremental scope - such learning, educational and re-engineering processes - or because of external forces, like mergers and acquisitions, restructuring goals, new regulations or disruptive technologies.

The title - I Changed My Mind Reviewing Everything - is a tribute to authors and scientists from different disciplinary fields that have illuminated my understanding of intentional change and decision making processes during the last thirty years, explaining how we think - or how we think about the way we think. The logo is a bit of a divertissement, from the latin divertere that means turn in separate ways.


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Goodbye and good luck!

A sweet farewell from the icm2re chair

How to cite this article?
Longo, Brunella (2021). Goodbye and good luck! A sweet farewell from the icm2re chair. icm2re [I Changed my Mind Reviewing Everything ISSN 2059-688X (Print)], 10.12 (December). http://www.icm2re.com/2021-12.html

How to cite this article?
Longo, Brunella (2021). Goodbye and good luck! A sweet farewell from the icm2re chair. icm2re [I Changed my Mind Reviewing Everything ISSN 2059-688X (Print)], 10.12 (December). http://www.icm2re.com/2021-12.html

London, 30 November 2021 - First of all, I regret to say this last year of icm2re has passed very fast! My ideas of writing on the change needed to transform a number of data practices intersected by the digital revolution will remain unfinished. But the topic is now indeed on the agenda of institutions, corporations and academic journals well beyond I imagined a decade ago (on the unfinished journey of data sciences see also icm2re 10.10).

I wonder how these icm2re articles will be read and interpreted in few years time, or by the end of the Century, when it will sound weird or curious that somebody had concerns, views and experiences like the ones I have expressed in these pages over the last ten years. Some changes, that have caused so much trouble to my generation, will even be totally unnoticed.

Few months ago, I had a little text argument (I mean... the type of argument you can have via SMS, you know...!) with a friend of mine who said my two vegan cakes are not real cakes because aren't made with sugar.

The first consists of a modified almond and polenta cake recipe with an energising citrus flavour. The second is a sort of german apple cake with the reassuring taste of cinnamon. In both cases, I have substituted dairy with cooked apples juice and vegetable oil - but more popular variants are always possible with butter or cream and yogurt - in case you fancy a try.

Finding exactly the right proportions between wet and dry ingredients has not been an easy thing to learn. I have also discovered that using different types of flour (almonds flour, apples or polenta flour and also different varieties of wheat flours) does change the taste enormously in vegan cakes, whereas such differences are less noticeable when using dairy in the dough (what a glorious metaphor for talking about semantic frames and discourses, isn't it?).

I am very proud of my two vegan cakes recipes. They are the best solution I devised so far to enjoy my breakfasts, to have the energy I need, and no risk to trigger a flare of my autoimmune disease and no upsetting consequences on my joints and muscles - these are issues exacerbated by the inflammation caused by some foods, with resulting debilitating fatigue and musculoskeletal disorders that everybody in older age or with compromised immune systemw may be familiar with.

So I replied to my friend that, technically speaking, my cakes contain about one spoon of demerara sugar in one case (against 200 gr of flour) and one spoon of icing sugar in the other (against 350 gr of mixed flours). That is enough to categorise them as sweet foods and not as bread with apples or polenta with almonds. They taste sweet too, of course.

If I have won or lost the argument I do not know and it does not matter too much: my friend did not reply, perhaps in commiseration, or because I convinced him that even a small quantity of sugar would be suffice to make my recipes belonging to the class of cakes and not to the class of bread.

The whole story showed me how much I love digging out, creating and classifying stuff in everything I do and everywhere I go, because classifying things makes differences visible and visible differences make change.

When we look back, any change we have made seems obvious.

Things have always been that way, haven't they?